likeafieldmouse:

Roy DeCarava

"DeCarava (pronounced dee-cuh-RAH-vah) turned his lens on the neighborhood of Harlem during the 1940s, ’50s and ’60s, depicting the everyday African American experience from an insider’s perspective.

His work, painterly studies of shadow and darkness, transcended racial boundaries, juxtaposing stark black-and-white tonality with highly impressionistic composition.

DeCarava was the first black photographer to receive a Guggenheim fellowship with the receipt of a $3,200 grant in 1952. His first major exhibit was at the Museum of Photographic Arts in San Diego in 1986; one decade later came a landmark solo retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art.”

I do not want a documentary or sociological statement. My goal is a creative expression, the kind of penetrating insight and understanding of Negroes which I believe only a Negro photographer can interpret. —Roy DeCarava

1. Man in Window

2. Subway Stairs, Two Men, New York

3. Ketchup Bottles, Table and Coat

4. Woman on Train

5. Window and Stove

6. Man with Portfolio

7. Mississippi Freedom Marcher, Washington D. C. 

8. Kids God Bless

9. Man Coming Up the Subway Stairs

10. Hallway

humansofnewyork:

"I still see the same people on the corner that were there when I was eleven years old. It’s tough to evolve when your surroundings never change. So I wasn’t sure that I could be the one to make it out. The first time I took the GED, I failed. But for two months after that, I did practice tests everyday. And my aunt is a teacher, so when she was finished grading her papers, she’d help me break down all the problems that I couldn’t figure out. And there were a lot of people in my corner. My mom encouraged me, and my sister, and my grandmother. Then the second time I passed. It felt so good to see something in yourself, and then to see it come true."

humansofnewyork:

"I still see the same people on the corner that were there when I was eleven years old. It’s tough to evolve when your surroundings never change. So I wasn’t sure that I could be the one to make it out. The first time I took the GED, I failed. But for two months after that, I did practice tests everyday. And my aunt is a teacher, so when she was finished grading her papers, she’d help me break down all the problems that I couldn’t figure out. And there were a lot of people in my corner. My mom encouraged me, and my sister, and my grandmother. Then the second time I passed. It felt so good to see something in yourself, and then to see it come true."